collisionwork: (missing)
Well, back in NYC with about a third of the work done that I wanted to get done while away (I think I actually usually get a quarter done that I'd like to, so maybe I'm ahead this time). Was welcomed back to NYC with a drive home from Maine that was lovely until I hit the city limits, whereupon it appeared to be one of those days where 60% of the driving populace of Gotham has drank the asshole water. This ended just two blocks from my home where someone, on a thin two-lane street, decided the people in front of him weren't going fast enough and crossed the double-yellow line to get by them, accelerating directly at me as if I was not there. That will wake you up. Hello NYC, I missed you.

So of course I came back expecting to continue the work I was doing in Maine and keep moving forward, but I was immediately sucked into a job that eliminated having any free time until tomorrow -- so this will not be a full update today, as I must leave shortly for a rehearsal, followed by a tech, followed by a performance.

I'm working on a fascinating piece called Absynth by Abigail Fischer, directed by Matt Gray. It's a 40-minute opera made up of 7 pieces by 6 composers that will be performing as part of an evening of short operas at Galapagos in DUMBO tonight. I was asked by Matt to do the lighting design, and wound up also being drafted to do the live sound mix, which has been enjoyable, but induces nerves -- it's simple, but delicate, and getting the right balance of Abigail's wireless mic, versus the backing tracks, versus the effect processing, requires attention and precision in ears and hands. I am dreading today a bit only because quite a few of my past experiences with going into clubs in this position have resulted in dealing with in-house lighting and sound people who are NOT helpful, to say the least. I should not expect this at Galapagos, so I should just calm down.

It looks to be a great evening, so if interested, follow the link (there's another link there for discount tickets).

As I have to run, all I have time for is a fast Random Ten (out of 25,430 on the iPod) for this Friday . . .

1."Eighties Fan" - Camera Obscura - Rough Trade Shops: Indiepop 1
2. "Enough Is Never Enough" - Blood And Roses - Return of the Batcave volume 1
3. "Paura Nella Casbah" - Franco Ferrara - Music Scene: Musica Per Radio - Televisione - Films
4. "Acid Drops" - Public Image Ltd. - That What Is Not
5. "Lost Weekend" - Wall Of Voodoo - Call of the West
6. "Just A Touch of Your Hand" - Al Gardner - Lost Deep Soul Treasures 4
7. "When My Baby's Beside Me" - Big Star -#1 Record/Radio City
8. "Flip Top Box" - Dicky Doo & The Don'ts - Lux & Ivy's Favorites Volume 10
9. "As A Child" - Suzanne Vega - 99.9 F°
10. "Fanatics" - Minutemen - The Punch Line

Okay, off to a day of trying to make things beautiful on the fly . . .

collisionwork: (Default)
Late on the usual post because I've been finishing up a heavy week's work lighting two shows.

Craven Monkey and the Mountain of Fury reopened at The Brick last week, but I had to relight the first two performances to work with a different plot, so I went back and spent two days reconstituting the normal Brick setup and re-relighting the show to bring it back to the original look I had for it in December (which I was quite happy with) along with some of the slight improvements I had made in version 2. I saw it again last night and it worked quite well.

Tonight, Rudolf II opened at Bohemian National Hall, and went quite well. It was a bit of a pain to light, given the layout of the show and what I had to work with, but it wound up being fine. It's by no means the first time I've had to light a show that plays on a thin long strip with the audience on both sides, but I still struggle to accomplish anything that makes me happy in that setup. There's still some rough edges -- most I can correct, but some not so much. Oh, well, it happens.

Tomorrow I get a day off, but the four or five things I want to fix in Craven Monkey are still nagging at me, so I may take a ride over to The Brick tomorrow to do that if I'm up for it. But I could use the rest.

It's been an odd week -- the work was long and tiring, yes, but more often obstacles would arise from someone or some organization doing something silly that made my job harder, but as I would be getting a good anger on, the problem would either vanish or a solution would appear that would be much better than any original plan, which was great, but would leave me with a big ball of unresolved anger and no place to put it. And having all that anger riding on you gets exhausting.

But all that's pretty much done, and it's on to the other work.

Meanwhile, back in the iPod, a Random Ten from out of 25,443 (with links to hear and/or see most of them on YouTube):

1. "The Art Of Everyday Communication Part 1" - The Light Footwork - One State Two State
2. "Man With A Gun" - Jerry Harrison - Casual Gods
3. "No One Knows My Plan" - They Might Be Giants - John Henry
4. "Lucky Day" - Tom Waits - The Black Rider
5. "Story Of Isaac" - Leonard Cohen - Songs From A Room
6. "Monster Man" - Soul Coughing - Mix Disk - Dad
7. "Skippy Is A Sissy" - Roy Gaines - Sin Alley, Vol. 1: Red Hot Rockabilly 1955 - 1962
8. "Got Love If You Want It (live 1964)" - The Yardbirds - Five Live
9. "Return Of The Rat" - Wipers - Wipers Box Set: Is This Real?
10. "Delia's Gone (original)" - Johnny Cash - Legend

And I have nothing new in the way of photos, but as for videos -- in honor of the recent announcement that Shout! Factory will be releasing the wonderful 1987 Max Headroom TV series on DVD, here's Max with Art of Noise, back when he seemed to be popping up everywhere:


A bizarre little spot from IHOP in 1969:


A local commercial that Berit and I fell for while up in Maine (we love local TV ads):


And the classic Apocalypse Pooh:


Back to rest . . .

collisionwork: (Default)
Late on the usual post because I've been finishing up a heavy week's work lighting two shows.

Craven Monkey and the Mountain of Fury reopened at The Brick last week, but I had to relight the first two performances to work with a different plot, so I went back and spent two days reconstituting the normal Brick setup and re-relighting the show to bring it back to the original look I had for it in December (which I was quite happy with) along with some of the slight improvements I had made in version 2. I saw it again last night and it worked quite well.

Tonight, Rudolf II opened at Bohemian National Hall, and went quite well. It was a bit of a pain to light, given the layout of the show and what I had to work with, but it wound up being fine. It's by no means the first time I've had to light a show that plays on a thin long strip with the audience on both sides, but I still struggle to accomplish anything that makes me happy in that setup. There's still some rough edges -- most I can correct, but some not so much. Oh, well, it happens.

Tomorrow I get a day off, but the four or five things I want to fix in Craven Monkey are still nagging at me, so I may take a ride over to The Brick tomorrow to do that if I'm up for it. But I could use the rest.

It's been an odd week -- the work was long and tiring, yes, but more often obstacles would arise from someone or some organization doing something silly that made my job harder, but as I would be getting a good anger on, the problem would either vanish or a solution would appear that would be much better than any original plan, which was great, but would leave me with a big ball of unresolved anger and no place to put it. And having all that anger riding on you gets exhausting.

But all that's pretty much done, and it's on to the other work.

Meanwhile, back in the iPod, a Random Ten from out of 25,443 (with links to hear and/or see most of them on YouTube):

1. "The Art Of Everyday Communication Part 1" - The Light Footwork - One State Two State
2. "Man With A Gun" - Jerry Harrison - Casual Gods
3. "No One Knows My Plan" - They Might Be Giants - John Henry
4. "Lucky Day" - Tom Waits - The Black Rider
5. "Story Of Isaac" - Leonard Cohen - Songs From A Room
6. "Monster Man" - Soul Coughing - Mix Disk - Dad
7. "Skippy Is A Sissy" - Roy Gaines - Sin Alley, Vol. 1: Red Hot Rockabilly 1955 - 1962
8. "Got Love If You Want It (live 1964)" - The Yardbirds - Five Live
9. "Return Of The Rat" - Wipers - Wipers Box Set: Is This Real?
10. "Delia's Gone (original)" - Johnny Cash - Legend

And I have nothing new in the way of photos, but as for videos -- in honor of the recent announcement that Shout! Factory will be releasing the wonderful 1987 Max Headroom TV series on DVD, here's Max with Art of Noise, back when he seemed to be popping up everywhere:


A bizarre little spot from IHOP in 1969:


A local commercial that Berit and I fell for while up in Maine (we love local TV ads):


And the classic Apocalypse Pooh:


Back to rest . . .

collisionwork: (Judo)
And the script writing/editing has been supplanted this week (and next) by becoming a lighting designer again.

I had to go in and relight Craven Monkey and the Mountain of Fury, as the first two performances are running in rep with the current mainstage hit show, the Debate Society's You're Welcome, and the lights have been changed from the house plot for their show. So I went in, did some fixes, and it looks okay. Probably better than okay, but I was very happy with my original work on the show, and I'm not sure it's as good now. Actually, I think a few things are improved here and there (and some lights/gobos brought in by Debate Society I've been allowed to use have balanced out no longer having any changeable colored backlight). I just miss some of the subtlety I was able to get from the regular plot. I was going to go in for opening night tonight, but Snowpocalypse 2: Electric Boogaloo (along with a slight illness that's been hovering on me for a couple of days) makes this a poor idea for tonight. Tomorrow, probably, then.

I'm also now lighting Untitled Theatre Co. #61's production of Rudolf II, which will be fun -- it's a great space, and I have the assistance, assistants, and equipment to make it all fine and good (though I may not quite have the time I would like) -- but somewhat of an unexpected gig, and I tend to get oddly thrown, personally, by sudden, unexpected things popping up anywhere outside of my work (and I don't like them there either). Saw a runthrough of the show the other day, and it's simple and something I can do well, but, yeah, I am worrying about the time to do it as good as I know I can. We'll see. Basically, I'm lighting the whole thing on Monday and making fixes over the couple of days after.

Otherwise, I'm writing as I can, going over the Devils script in prep for a reading late in March, planning the wedding, helping Berit with her own work on Rudolf II, and having my weekly improvisation sessions with David Finkelstein (that I still need to write about). And listening to even more music than usual.

Speaking of which -- from among the 25,446 tracks on the iPod, here's a Random Ten (with associated links) for this week . . .

1. "One Of Those Things" - Dexy's Midnight Runners - Don't Stand Me Down - The Director's Cut
2. "I'd Rather Be Burned As a Witch" - Eartha Kitt- This October: A BenT Howl-O-Ween Mix
3. "You Bowed Down" - Elvis Costello & The Attractions - All This Useless Beauty
4. "Hawaii Five-O Theme" - The Ventures - Hawaii Five-O
5. "Ain't Going Home" - Telli Mills - Sin Alley, Vol. 2: Red Hot Rockabilly 1955 - 1962
6. "Here Come The Lies" - Sham 69 - Hollywood Hero
7. "Behind Closed Doors" - Charlie Rich - Love Songs
8. "Your Honor" - Regina Spektor - Soviet Kitsch
9. "Quicksand" - David Bowie - Hunky Dory
10. "Hey Joe" - Roy Buchanan - That's What I Am Here For

And I got some kitty pictures for this week. Here's Hooker being playful on B's lap as she computes . . .
Crazy Lap Kitty

And him being happy and stretchy-adorable by her foot on the couch . . .
Fuzzy Belly & Foot

So, yes, today was the surprise snow day that looks worse than the big anticipated one earlier this month. And it was a day Berit and I were going to drive around and get stuff for Rudolf II. I didn't think it was a good idea, but I agreed to drive to Staples -- by half a block from home, Berit saw why I didn't think it was a good idea (though this below is Avenue P, which was actually plowed, unlike Avenue S).
Snow Day 2 - Not Fun Driving

On the other hand, I was probably lucky to do this, as when we got to Staples, I discovered I had a flat tire, and probably had since I left home, and before -- and the Staples is only a half-block from the tire-repair joint where I get my alignments done. So the flat fix wound up being quick.
Snow Day 2 - East on S

I wasn't going to drive out further after that today, so we went home and B went off on errands by train. You can see how happy she is about it . . .
Snow Day 2 - Berit on Errands

And I took pictures from the subway stair landing . . .
Snow Day 2 - Up McDonald

And under it . . .
Snow Day 2 - Under El Snow

Before an odd brief break in the snow gave us blue skies and sun for a bit . . .
Snow Day 2 - Birds and Blue Skies?

And I came home to write this slowly and listen over and over to a favorite "new" song that I found among the thousands I have in the iTunes that I haven't listened to as yet -- I download tons of comps and can't get through them all, so I get surprised by discoveries all the time.

Here's a YouTube video featuring this song, "You Haven't Seen My Love" by Danny Hernandez & The Odds, from Michigan, 1967 (invisible on Facebook, but I posted it separately there). I'm as obsessed with this song as I was with Sagittarius' "Gladys" last year, but I have no show this year to get it into, unfortunately. I'll have the perfect scene for it someday . . .



Back to trying not to be ill and thinking about the work . . .

collisionwork: (chiller)
I've spent the last few evenings lighting the new show from Nosedive Productions, opening tomorrow:
The Blood Brothers present... The Master of Horror.

These are three short stories by Stephen King adapted for the stage (note: links include spoilers): "Nona," adapted by James Comtois; "Quitters, Inc.," adapted by Qui Nguyen; and "In the Deathroom" adapted by Mac Rogers; all directed by The Blood Brothers: Patrick Shearer and Pete Boisvert (jesus, it's a showfull o'bloggers!). Plus several other short interstitial bits (a couple of them long enough really to not quite count as vignettes): "The Last Waltz," the poem "Paranoid: A Chant," and the wonderfully nauseating "Survivor Type" (which I read aloud on the 1985 Halloween episode of my high school radio show on WNMH, grossing out many listeners, heh-heh-heh).

It's been a fun gig (I had to come in quick and replace the original designer, who got another gig, which is why you won't see my name anywhere on this right now) and an enjoyable show.

I'm a King fan from way back, as uneven as he is (I sent him a fan letter so many years ago that he was still answering fan mail, and I got a personal postcard response from him answering questions of mine and telling me about his upcoming books Firestarter, Cujo, and Danse Macabre), and have always been especially fond of his short stories, which aren't probably his best work, but are great reads that at their worst are still as fun as (and much in the style of) the EC horror comics of the 50s - Tales from the Crypt, The Vault of Horror, The Haunt of Fear - with their twisty plots and gruesome comeuppances. Like those comics, which featured The Crypt-Keeper, The Vault-Keeper, and The Old Witch chuckling (heh-heh-heh) over the misfortunes of the poor dumb slobs in their stories, Nosedive's occasional grand guignol shows - they've done two others - have their own hosts, The Blood Brothers (aided in this new show by a Blood Sister, it seems):
The Blood Brothers

So in my viewings thus far of the show, I've been enjoying it at the level of one of those classic comic books, alternately horrified or amused (or both at once). There will be plenty of blood and ichor, that's for sure.

And I'm just geeky enough to imagine which EC artists, who each had a very distinctive style, would have been assigned to each story: "Nona" would have worked done by Wally Wood; "Quitters, Inc." by Jack Davis; "Survivor Type" by "Ghastly" Graham Ingels; "In the Deathroom" by Jack Kamen; and, if lucky, Bernie Krigstein on "Paranoid: A Chant," with wraparound host segments by Johnny Craig. That'd be a good read of a comic book, there.

I can't exactly imitate the look of the books with what I have to light the stories - no lurid Creepshow effects - but at the same time I wouldn't really want to - it's not at all played those comics, though it may feel like them in some ways (that's just inherent in the original King stories).

In any case, I have to work with a somewhat limited house light plot - all house light plots are limited, but this one really comes down to banks of lights in cans on track lighting, with a manual 2-scene preset board. I've added two floor-mounted birdies and two clip lights for some additional effects, but it's pretty bare bones. I've spent years by now though being "the guy who works well with any simple house plot" so I think I got a good look for the whole show out of this. Very noir, which might be expected from me, but the limitations kinda lead to it. Very little color - I've been told I can regel the lights if I really wanted to, but as regelling in this case means removing the gels that are gaff-taped to the cans and sticking new ones on, I thought it'd be best to keep it simple. I've got three colors in limited areas I can bring in - deep red, deep green, and light blue-white - so I'm saving those for special bits and just using the larger washes as elegantly as I can.

Yeah, keep it simple. It's already a headache for Ben, the company member acting as board op, to do the cues on the manual board, with some fast dimmer repatches in there, and a lot of sound cues at the same time, but he turned out to be able to handle it much better than I expected last night (I once had a stage manager/board op walk off a show I was designing/directing when I gave her the cue list and she said it was impossible to run - it was hard, sure, but Berit or I could have handled it fine - and wound up doing so - and Ben obviously could have done that one as well).

Fine cast doing good work here, too, most of whom I don't know. I know Jessi Gotta and Michael Criscuolo (another blogger!) well enough though that when I heard they were in the show, and what stories were being done, I pegged exactly what characters they'd be playing, respectively, in "Nona" and "Quitters, Inc." Jessi also gets to do the solo performance of "Paranoid: A Chant" which is my favorite part of the show - it's my kind of piece and I get to do my favorite kind of lighting for it, which tries to feel like it's coming out of a person's emotions as they flip around, complementing their emotional state.

Well, I'll be on The Master of Horror another two nights and then back home to The Brick to design the next episode of Bryan Enk & Matt Gray's Penny Dreadful and help out on Robert Honeywell and Moira Stone's new musical, LORD OXFORD BRINGS YOU THE SECOND AMERICAN REVOLUTION, LIVE! - being the necessary and appropriate response to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's suppression of the freedoms and dignity of the European-American settlers and their descendants in the Royal Eastern American Colonies and the inordinate conferring of special favours and privileges on the merciless Indian savages and the former Negro slaves, in the year Two Thousand and Eight.

But those are later this month . . . first up, opening tomorrow:

The Blood Brothers present... The Master of Horror
at
Endtimes Underground at The Gene Frankel Theatre
24 Bond Street (between Bowery & Lafayette)
October 9-11, 16-18, 23-25, 30-31, & November 1, 2008
Thursday through Saturday, 7.30 pm
$18.00
Tickets HERE

It'll warm your heart. And then eat it, heh-heh-heh.

Crime SuspenStories #22

(Berit is amused by the cover tagline, noting that, to her, a "jolting tale of tension" would be more on the order of "Urgh! I got to get these FORMS in!" and not exactly something on the order of what's depicted here . . .)

It Starts

Mar. 27th, 2008 12:19 pm
collisionwork: (red room)
Last night I went over to The Brick to see a bit of a rehearsal of Babylon Babylon, which I'm now designing the lights for (original designer couldn't do it).

I need to see a few more rehearsals to figure out how to make it work - I can do it with the instruments we have, sure, but I need to really buckle down on what to put where - can't be wasteful at all with instruments on this. The Brick is pretty much all opened up, with rows of seats against the walls, as Frank Cwiklik did with Bitch Macbeth in January.

Babylon Babylon in rehearsal

There's a low central platform, a big stairs/dais piece (the "holy ground") at one end (with projection screen to be bisecting it) and 16 small areas where people have a kind of "home base." Jeff tells me there's really just about 8 real areas to deal with isolating, which helps. I have 26 source-4s (two with I-Cues, two with color scrollers), with 3 others that are broken but fixable (I have the parts), 1 PAR can, two working birdies on floor stands (maybe another one or two fixable), another floor stand for the PAR or a source-4 (and I can always make more if I need them), and basically 31 dimmers (+1 for the house lights). I can make it look good, I'm sure, but I need to see how the whole show moves before I figure out how.

Babylon Babylon in rehearsal 2

23 out of the 32 listed cast members were there last night, including many friends and frequent collaborators. It'll be fun coming by to these rehearsals and seeing everyone without having to direct them or act with them for once.

So tonight is a first meeting for one of my August shows, Everything Must Go (Invisible Republic #2).

This show is to be "a play with and in dance," and is being built around the actors, so I don't have very much to it yet. A vague structure and setting, some visual, scenic, and choreographic ideas, and the characters I think the 13 actors will be playing -- assuming I have all 13 actors - some haven't replied or said anything to me since agreeing - sometimes vaguely - to do the show. Tonight I'm expecting 8, maybe 9 of the actors. Maybe. I'll see who shows.

I think the show will be about 75-95 minutes long, in one act, in two defined parts that take place in the advertising agency setting - either two days or one day split in half by lunch. I hope I don't lose any more actors (and I keep the one who's still checking schedule to see if she can do it).

Oh, and I have some music for this. Probably most or all of it, some may be added, some may be dropped. I like these songs basically for their sound, the way I feel movement flowing to them, and the emotional rise and fall of the action in the show as a whole as I see it - the only problem is that they are songs, with lyrics, and while the intensity and feel of the song as a whole is exactly what I'm looking for, sometimes the words are distracting, and would seem to impart meanings to the scenes they're intended for that aren't supposed to be there.

But I don't have anything better as yet for those scenes, so these songs will stay until anything better comes up (unlikely). I spent some of the morning burning CDs of the music to be able to give to the cast tonight. Here's what's on them:

PRESHOW:
1. "Anthology" - The Kay Gees
2. "Listen to the Band" - The Monkees

SHOW, part 1 (morning to afternoon, or maybe day one; I don't know yet):
3. "Jimmy Carter" - Electric Six
4. "Slug" - Passengers
5. "Down at McDonnelzz" - Electric Six
6. "Dry Bones" - The Four Lads
7. "Laughing" - Pere Ubu
8. "Transylvanian Concubine" - Rasputina
9. "Shannon Stone (mashup)" - Mark Vidler/Go Home Productions
10. "Not Yet Remembered" - Harold Budd & Brian Eno

SHOW, part 2 (afternoon to evening, or maybe day two; I don't know yet):
11. "The Coo-Coo Bird" - Clarence "Tom" Ashley
12. "Paradise Flat" - The Status Quo
13. "Maybe" - The Chantels
14. "In Every Dream Home a Heartache" - Roxy Music
15. "Uptight Maggie (mashup)" - Mark Vidler/Go Home Productions
16. "Episode of Blonde" - Elvis Costello
17. "Theme One" - George Martin
18. "Back of a Truck" - Regina Spektor

POSTSHOW and EXIT:
19. "Money Changes Everything" - Cyndi Lauper
20. "I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts" - X

I have no idea yet if this odd jumble of styles and sounds will mix in an interesting and ultimately coherent way, or simply seem scattered, disparate, and unfocused. I think it'll work the way I want it to, and unfortunately confuse some people, which I'd rather not do, but whatever. You can't make it work for everyone.

Tonight I'll play the music and watch how people move (several are trained dancers, of various styles, some are musical-theatre people with some dance, some are actors who move well, and there are a couple that I have no idea about, but they seemed to be needed in this world and I'll choreograph around however they move). Maybe set them up in patterns and see how they work visually. Think about words they look like they should be saying.

So much of me hates working this way, making it up as I go along, but I just know I have to do it this way right now.

From today until the August shows are done - 151 days - Berit and I will have a total of 27 days without a rehearsal or performance of one of our four shows - and never two days in a row except maybe between Ambersons performances in early June. And most of those 27 will be filled up with work to get the shows and space ready (as well as working on Babylon Babylon, Penny Dreadful, and The Film Festival: A Theater Festival). And then the two days after the shows are over will be spent getting The Brick spiffed up for this year's Clown Theatre Festival, followed by another 33 days straight of techs and performances for that festival (and Penny Dreadful again).

We finally get some time off September 29-October 17. Until then, we're pretty much busy every day on shows.

We're fucking nuts.

collisionwork: (Default)
Okay, no post for over a week. Problems with internet access at home, as well as being busy at The Brick, have kept me away from the blog, my emails, and the internet in general. So I'm on a computer at the Gravesend library branch, with limited time to post an update.


We're back from Maine. Berit and I have been working all week on The Bouffon Glass Menajoree, which I've written about before. I'd link to where I wrote, but the library computer doesn't let me open multiple windows, so I'm stuck in this posting window, only linking to sites I know off the top of my head. Berit and I completely rehung and recabled The Brick to a new house plot we devised that should work quite well, though we're short a few feet of 4-pin DMX control cable, so we can't quite put the two color scroller units where we want them yet. Also, even though we chose very light amber gels for the plot, it's still too damn yellow in general. Have to fix that.


Bouffon Glass Menajoree is still funny, amazing, vicious, and more than worth seeing. Look it up online, and if it looks even a bit like something you'd want to see, it is, so come pay the $10 (cheap!) and enjoy it. I did the light design on it this time, and I think that came off well, too.


Also, I wanted to plug Tom X. Chao's new show, The Peculiar Utterance of the Day: Live on Stage! at The Red Room as part of The Frigid Festival. Can't link to it, so search if you like, you'll find it. I haven't seen it yet, but I will on Tuesday. Tom's work is always worth seeing and, as he noted on one of his recent podcasts, he has a cast that is three-quarters made up of regulars from my shows.


Nine minutes left before this computer shuts down on me.


No cat blogging again this week. Here's a Random Ten that came up yesterday morning that I wrote down, without comment:


1. "I Would Do Anything for Love (but I Won't Do That)" - Meat Loaf - Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell
2. "A Little Bit of Soap" - The Jarmels - The Doo Wop Box III, vol. 1: The Hits
3. "Crime Doesn't Pay (from Jerry Cotton)" - The Peter Thomas Sound Orchestra - Film Musik
4. "Idaho" - The John Buzon Trio - Inferno!
5. "I Think It's Going to Rain Today" - Randy Newman - Lonely at the Top: The Best of Randy Newman
6. "Three and Nine" - Roxy Music - Country Life
7. "Crush (live at WFMU)" - Tall Dwarfs - They Came, They Played, They Blocked the Driveway
8. "Easy Skanking" - Bob Marley & The Wailers - Kaya
9. "Art, the White Elephant" - The Residents - WB:RMX
10. "Dr. Kildare" - Mono Puff - Unsupervised


Two minutes left on here. More as soon as I can.


UPDFATE: I was able to go back and add links, despite what was said above.


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